“Hot, Hotter, Hottest: 300 Years of New Jersey Ceramics” on view at the Newark Museum – 22.10.2016-30.12.2017 – 12510

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Vase. Greenwood Art Pottery Company, Trenton, 1880-90. Slip-cast porcelain with carved, gold paste and enamel. Gift of Emma and Jay Lewis, 2011 2011.12.2, 13”H x 6 ½”Di.

On October 22, the Newark Museum opened its first-ever permanent gallery celebrating the extraordinary history of ceramics production in the state of New Jersey. Installed within the “House & Home” galleries in the National Historic Landmark Ballantine House, Hot, Hotter, Hottest : 300 years of New Jersey Ceramics provides audiences with a greater understanding of how New Jersey’s natural resources shaped its ceramics industry; the influence of New Jersey ceramics manufacturers and the production techniques they used; how pottery was used in different time periods and across social strata; and how, in the 21st century, contemporary makers continue to build upon New Jersey’s pottery tradition.No other institution is better suited to tell the story of New Jersey’s ceramics history than the Newark Museum. The museum’s New Jersey ceramics collection began in 1910 with an exhibition entitled Modern American Pottery, which included both art pottery from Newark’s Clifton Pottery, and porcelain from Trenton’s Lenox China. In 1915, the institution became the first museum in the country to produce an exhibition focused on a regional industry when it presented The Clay Products of New Jersey. Hot, Hotter, Hottest directly builds upon this institutional history while putting to good use the Museum’s remarkable collection of historical New Jersey ceramics—one of the most important such collections in the United States.

The Museum’s Chief Curator and Curator of Decorative Arts, Ulysses Grant Dietz, has created a checklist of 101 objects for inclusion in New Jersey Clay, to mark the 101st anniversary since the landmark exhibition of 1915. Ceramics high and low create a broad material perspective, including stonewares, yellowwares and Rockingham wares produced in the Amboys, Flemington and, Trenton, which became known in the 19th century as the “Staffordshire of the New World.” The development of refined whitewares and, ultimately, porcelain, is an important part of the story. So admired was the state capital’s output of ceramics that, in 1918, President Woodrow Wilson and his wife Edith commissioned Lenox, the Trenton-based manufacturer, to create the White House dining service.

Of course, it was a long road to the White House. In addition to showcasing the state’s achievement in ceramics, Hot, Hotter, Hottest traces the chronology of the industry in New Jersey, beginning with the geographic distribution of the clay pits and their influence on early settlement patterns. The earliest of New Jersey’s clay products were “redwares”—functional terracotta pieces that proved impractical to ship. A dish produced by Phillip Durell in Elizabethtown in 1793 is on display as an early example. Large yellow and gray clay beds in the Amboys yielded a great deal of raw material, enabling the early growth of the ceramics industry in the state. A stoneware beer mug helps tell this story, as does a rare Greek Revival coffee pot made by Jersey City’s D. J. Henderson Pottery ca. 1829-33; a mid-19th century Shaving Mug made by Charles Coxon & Company in South Amboy; and approximately 20 other functional items such as crocks, jugs and pitchers.

As time progressed and New Jersey potteries grew more technologically adept, stonewares and earthenwares were joined by more artful products. Majolica (earthenware with brightly colored glazes) grew popular in the late 19th century, and Trenton’s output of quality pieces helped put it on the map as the center of America’s ceramics industry. Several Trenton-made majolica objects are on display in the exhibition, including a unique potpourri jar made by Trenton’s Eureka Pottery and an exhibition vase produced by J.S. Mayer of the Arsenal Pottery for the New Orleans Cotton Centennial Exhibition of 1884.

By the mid-1800s, New Jersey makers began importing kaolin from nearby Pennsylvania, supplement the state’s own kaolin beds, that allowed them to produce refined whitewares and the translucent porcelain goods that enabled America to compete for the first time with European manufacturers in the luxury market. Hot, Hotter, Hottest includes rare examples of early porcelain, including parian wares by William Bloor and porcelain by William Young from the 1850s.

Trenton-born Walter Scott Lenox opened his Ceramic Art Company in 1889, a first-of-its-kind art studio (as opposed to factory) ceramics production facility. This was reflective of the industry in Trenton, where ceramics had indeed progressed to an art form. Alongside the production of utilitarian pieces, artists created ceramic figures, vases and other decorative items designed to be admired, not used. Roughly half of the objects on display in Hot, Hotter, Hottest are such objects of beauty, including the anchor piece of the exhibition: a porcelain and enamel “Grecian Vase” created for the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exhibition, or St. Louis World’s Fair, by the Trenton Potteries Company. Having been separated for some time, the vase has been reunited with its original base for the first time in this exhibition.

Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein presents exhibition of works from the Hilti Art Foundation – Vaduz – 16.12.2016-08.10.2017 – 10510

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Exhibition view Hilti Art Foundation, photo: Roland Tännler © Hilti Art Foundation.
The second exhibition of the Hilti Art Foundation has opened in Vaduz. The show focuses on classical modernism and includes works by Gauguin, Picasso, Kirchner, Beckmann and Klee. Contemporary art is prominently featured, with artworks by Imi Knoebel, Gotthard Graubner and Sean Scully amongst others. The exhibition presents 36 selected paintings and sculptures from the internationally renowned private art collection.

After its exceptionally successful exhibition premiere in its own gallery, which is an extension of Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, the Hilti Art Foundation is proud to present the next instalment, titled “Kirchner, Léger, Scully & more”. Visitors will recognise some of the paintings and sculptures presented on the three levels of the building: 16 of these artworks were featured in the first exhibition. Curator Uwe Wieczorek has picked them again to enable visitors to view them in a new context. Another objective is to keep specific key artworks on display over a longer period of time.“The outstanding works of the pioneers of modernism and of the important representatives of the avantgardes of the first half of the 20th century are a huge benefit for the public. And in regard to art after 1950, there are a lot of links between the collections of the Kunstmuseum and the Hilti Art Foundation”, says Dr. Friedemann Malsch, Director of Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein.

The exhibition starts on the lower ground level of the building with a French touch; this part of the show is devoted to an exploration of the human form, and more specifically the female form. The depictions of women by Lehmbruck, Hodler, Picasso, Léger and Laurens show life in full bloom and at its most beautiful. In contrast, Giacometti’s Quatre femmes sur socle (1950) sculpture conveys a sense of tangible sensuality withdrawing into aloof immateriality.

Paintings, and particularly ones by German artists, define the character of the first floor. This part of the exhibition includes four paintings by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, the key representative of the artist group “Brücke”. Another focal point is set with paintings by Max Beckmann, such as Selbstbildnis mit Glaskugel (Self-Portrait with Crystal Ball), which is now surrounded by other Beckmann paintings from the 1920s, 30s and 40s.

The upper floor is devoted to paintings from 1980 to the present day. This section includes works by Imi Knoebel, Gotthard Graubner and Sean Scully, three artists who applied completely different approaches and techniques, but who all represent abstract art in its most mature form.

Michael Hilti, President of the Hilti Art Foundation, is very pleased about the solely positive response to the exhibition. “I have been approached by people who wanted to express their gratitude for the allocation of the artworks and the building itself. It is very satisfying to know that the Hilti Art Foundation is so well received by the public.”

Art of Bugatti exhibit at the Petersen Automotive Museum – Los Angeles, CA – 30.10.2016-01.10.2017 – 12508

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1925 Bugatti Type 35C Grand Prix.

The Petersen Automotive Museum announces the opening of its newest exhibition, The Art of Bugatti. The exhibition features a rare assemblage of Bugatti family artwork and Bugatti automobiles including rare Atlantic and Royale models, as well as the fastest production super sports car ever built, the new Bugatti Chiron. The exhibit is located in the Mullin Grand Salon on the museum’s first floor and will run through the fall of 2017.”The work of the Bugatti family has become a great passion of mine over the years,” said Peter Mullin, Chairman of the Board of Directors for the Petersen Automotive Museum. “They are one of the greatest art dynasties of the 20th century and yet many people are only familiar with their automotive works. The purpose of this exhibit is to help the public see how four generations of one family have been creating beauty in different ways – furniture, sculpture, paintings, writings and automobiles. The mediums differ but their passion and aesthetic is constant.”

“This is the most significant Bugatti exhibition ever mounted. It is a great honor for us and we would like to thank the Petersen Automotive Museum, and Peter Mullin in particular, for making this possible”, said Stefan Brungs, Member of the Board of Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S. for Sales, Marketing and Customer Service at the opening event. “No other automotive manufacturer could display the history of the brand with sculptures, furniture, paintings and many other objects of decorative art in addition to a host of dazzling automotive masterpieces, which is crowned by Bugatti’s latest creation, the new Chiron. The Art of Bugatti is celebrating the roots, the past, the presence and the future of this unique brand.”

The Art of Bugatti exhibit gives museum-goers an inside look at the history of the Bugatti family beginning with its patriarch, Carlo Bugatti, and his unique path through the arts which included a mastery of architecture, painting, Art Nouveau furniture design and silversmithing. It then goes into great detail on the work of his sons, sculptor Rembrandt and carmaker Ettore Bugatti, as well as Ettore’s children and studies the influence of Rembrandt’s animal-life sculptures on his brother Ettore’s art-deco era automotive designs, both of which incorporate the Fibonacci sequence, or “golden mean.” Art of Bugatti also offers a history of the family itself, including correspondence and historical artifacts.

The vehicles on display include the 1925 Bugatti Type 35C Grand Prix, a 1939 Bugatti Type 44 Fiacre, a 1930 Bugatti Type 46 Cabriolet, a 1931 Bugatti Type 50 S, a 1931 Bugatti Type 54, a 1932 Bugatti Type 55 Supersport, one of four 1935 Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantics, 1939 Bugatti Type 57C Aravis by Gangloff, a 1939 Bugatti Type 57C by Vanvooren, a 1939 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante by Gangloff, 1939/49 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante, and the last Bugatti overseen by members of the family, the 1951 Bugatti Type 101C. Also on display are the extremely rare 1994 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport Le Mans and the aforementioned Chiron, which will be on display until early November.

Guests will learn of the Bugatti family’s great triumphs and many tragedies beginning with the death of Rembrandt as well as the untimely death of Ettore’s son Jean Bugatti. In addition to the vehicles, the exhibit includes paintings, sculpture, writings, furniture and other Bugatti family designs.

The Art of Bugatti exhibition represents a once in a lifetime opportunity for museum guests to experience the Bugatti family in all their splendor and to see an unprecedented number of their beautiful automobiles in one place, displayed as they should be, as art.

Exhibition at Berlinische Galerie displays about 250 works from its collection – Berlin – 01.01.2017-31.12.2017 – 10507

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The Berlinische Galerie presents about 250 works from its collection in a richly faceted chronological tour through the art of Berlin from 1880 to 1980. They range from paintings of the late 19th century, when the Kaiser reigned and tastes were largely determined by the moneyed classes, via Expressionism and the East European avant-garde to post-war modern architecture and the “wild” works of the seventies.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the Collection, this is a dialogue between major works of painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography and architecture. They illustrate the diversity of artistic styles and techniques, and also the tensions, antagonisms and radical shifts which have been such hallmarks of Berlin as a hub of the arts until the present day. As a modern metropolis attracting more young artists from all over the world than ever before, Berlin is still caught up in the constant whirl of new departures.

Significant works, key artists and styles
In the Fine Arts, there are paintings and sculptures by great artists such as Max Liebermann, Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, Naum Gabo and Wolf Vostell. There is also a chance to discover works by lesser-known protagonists of Impressionism, Expressionism, the East European avantgarde, New Objectivity, Art Informel and the figurative art of the 1960s and 1970s. We make a special effort to recall those artists who had slipped into oblivion as a result of the two World Wars and, in particular, the repression suffered by art and artists during the Nazi regime, such as Felix Nussbaum, Hannah Höch and Werner Heldt.

The Berlinische Galerie boasts one of Germany’s major collections of artistic Photography, reflecting the significant role Berlin played in the medium’s history from about 1900 until 1980. On display at the moment are early street photographs from around 1900 (Heinrich Zille), modernist works from the 1920s (Steffi Brandl, Fritz Brill), photojournalism of the same period (Erich Salomon, Felix H. Man), Nazi propaganda images from the magazine “Volk und Welt”, pictures of the aftermath of World War II (Yevgeni Khaldei and Ivan Mikhailovitch Shagin), “subjective photography” from the 1950s (Fritz Kühn) and the young movement of Autorenfotografie in the 1970s (Gabriele and Helmut Nothhelfer).

Highlights in the collection of Prints and Drawings include a considerable volume of output from Dada (Hannah Höch and others), New Objectivity (Jeanne Mammen, Gertrude Sandmann) and the post-war period from 1945 (Hans Uhlmann, Werner Heldt). While a major show on Jeanne Mammen is planned for 2017, others such as Gertrude Sandmann and Hans Uhlmann convey a sense of the difficult years between 1933 and 1945, and the drawings by Werner Heldt are tinged with the melancholy of reconstruction after 1945.

Apart from the model of the Star Church (designed in 1921/1922 by Otto Bartning) and the films and photographs recording projects of the 1930s (Hermann Kaspar, Albert Speer), the Architecture collection offers plans, sketches, photographs and models to illustrate important schemes and buildings in Berlin during the period known as post-war modernism (1950s to early 1970s).

The Artists’ Archives, full of catalogues, magazines, historical photographs and sales records, trace early approaches to publicising modern art. Beginning with the pioneering exhibitions of the Berlin Secession, the pathway leads to the revolutionary ethos of the Weimar Republic. Innovative strategies such as postcards created by artists, published by Herwarth Walden for his gallery Der Sturm, can be explored alongside exhibition guides by the Novembergruppe designed to reach a new audience.

Temporary displays
Individual works in the Presentation from the Collection are replaced at irregular intervals because they also have a role to play as loans. Besides, photographs and prints that are particularly sensitive to light are switched over on grounds of conservation. To find out what is currently on display, consult Collection Online on our website www.berlinischegalerie.de.

To mark the Month of Photography, one room has been devoted to Erich Salomon (01.10.2016–28.02.2017). He was one of the best-known pictorial journalists of the 1920s, not to mention one of the most significant photographers of the 20th century. The second Thomas Friedrich Scholarship has been used to explore “The unknown Erich Salomon” and unearth new aspects of his self-marketing techniques, which are set out here.

The drawings on temporary display include five from Hans Uhlmann’s Tegel sketchbook: they depict wire heads, designs for sculptures he made secretly in the years 1935-1945. He kept the sketchbook in prison in 1933-1935. Uhlmann had been arrested for distributing antifascist leaflets and was sent down for “preparing acts of high treason” (02.06–05.12.2016).

Until May 2017, photographs, drawings and models will change at regular intervals to highlight the work of the following architects and partnerships as examples of post-war modernism in Berlin during the 1960s and early 1970s: Candilis-Josic-Woods and Schiedhelm, Rolf Gutbrod and Frei Otto, Sergius Ruegenberg. The displays will include the plans for the Freie Universität in Berlin, the Centre Pompidou in Paris (competition entry, 2nd Prize, not implemented) and the German Pavilion for EXPO 67 in Montreal (designs and implementation).

Artists (selected): Otto Bartning, Max Beckmann, Rudolf Belling, Steffi Brandl, Fritz Brill, Candilis-Josic-Woods and Schiedhelm, Robert Capa, Otto Dix, Rainer Fetting, Naum Gabo, Rolf Gutbrod and Frei Otto, Werner Heldt, Hannah Höch, Hermann Kaspar, Yevgeny Khaldei, Oskar Kokoschka, Fritz Kühn, Max Liebermann, Walter Leistikow, Jeanne Mammen, Ludwig Meidner, Gabriele and Helmut Nothhelfer, Felix Nussbaum, Iwan Puni, Sergius Ruegenberg, Erich Salomon, Gertrude Sandmann, Iwan Michailowitsch Schagin, Eugen Schönebeck, Fred Thieler, Hans Uhlmann, Wolf Vostell, Julie Wolfthorn, Anton von Werner, Heinrich Zille.