Museum of Fine Arts, Boston presents exhibitions of works by Charles Sheeler and Alfred Stieglitz – Boston, MASS – 22.07.2017-05.11.2017 – 12615

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Charles Sheeler (American, 1883–1965), Side of White Barn, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1915. Photograph, gelatin silver print © The Lane Collection. Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

“Charles Sheeler from Doylestown to Detroit” celebrates the MFA’s unparalleled holdings of works by Charles Sheeler (1883–1965), presenting 40 photographs from three significant series created during the heyday of his career as a founder of American modernism. After enjoying success as a painter, Sheeler initially took up photography as a way to make a living. His experiments with the medium included the 1916-17 series of photographs capturing various elements of an 18th-century house he rented in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The sequence of stark, geometric compositions was among the most abstract and avant-garde work being made in the US at the time—created in response to the Cubist art of Picasso and Braque that Sheeler had previously encountered in Europe. In 1920, Sheeler collaborated with fellow photographer Paul Strand on the short film Manhatta, presenting dramatic views of lower Manhattan. Abstract stills from the 35mm film, which was shot from steep angles, are presented alongside larger prints of Sheeler’s cinematic images of New York City, produced shortly after Manhatta—which he used as source material for his paintings. The exhibition culminates with the 1927 photographs of the Ford Motor Company plant in River Rouge, Michigan, commissioned to celebrate the introduction of Ford’s Model A. The cathedral-like scenes convey an optimism for American industry, and are now considered icons of Machine Age photography. All of the photographs in the exhibition are drawn from the Museum’s Lane Collection—one of the finest private holdings of 20th-century American art in the world, including Sheeler’s entire photographic estate—given to the MFA in 2012. Presented with support from the Benjamin A. Trustman and Julia M. Trustman Fund.
Continue reading “Museum of Fine Arts, Boston presents exhibitions of works by Charles Sheeler and Alfred Stieglitz – Boston, MASS – 22.07.2017-05.11.2017 – 12615”

Exhibition at Nassau County Museum of Art demonstrates how artists have portrayed New York City – Roslyn Harbor, NY – 22.07.2017-05.11.2017 – 12610

John Sloan Bleecker, Street Saturday Night, 1918. Oil on canvas, 26 x 32 inches. Crystal Bridges Museum of Art, Bentonville, Arkansas.

From its earliest years, New York City was the stage on which the transformation of America played out, reflecting economic and historic upheavals that led to the city’s place as both the financial and art capitals of the world. New York, New York presents the city’s grit and glamour, its excitement and bustle, and the heartbeat of a great metropolis through the work of John Sloan, Reginald Marsh, Childe Hassam, Red Grooms, Robert Henri, Fairfield Porter, Berenice Abbott, Milton Avery, Georgia O’Keeffe, Arthur Leipzig and many others. Guest curated by Director Emerita Constance Schwartz and including more than 140 works of art, New York, New York opens at Nassau County Museum of Art in Roslyn Harbor, New York on Saturday, July 22, 2017 and remains on view through Sunday, November 5, 2017.
Continue reading “Exhibition at Nassau County Museum of Art demonstrates how artists have portrayed New York City – Roslyn Harbor, NY – 22.07.2017-05.11.2017 – 12610”

The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago presents first-ever museum exhibition of Amanda Williams – 18.07.2017-31.12.2017- 12607

Amanda Williams, Pink Oil Moisturizer from Color(ed) Theory Suite, 2014–16. Courtesy of the artist and McCormick Gallery.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago presents the first-ever museum exhibition of breakout Chicago artist Amanda Williams, featuring a new addition to her highly acclaimed project, Color(ed) Theory, which debuted at the first Chicago Architecture Biennial. The bright, monochromatic houses painted as part of Color(ed) Theory bring attention to the overwhelming number of vacancies on Chicago’s South Side, reflecting Williams’ perspective that architecture serves as a microcosm for larger social issues. Together with new works such as A Dream or Substance, a Beamer, a Necklace or Freedom? — where Williams invited Englewood-based collaborators to gild a room in imitation gold leaf in the same proportion of a Chicago lot, and then sealed off the room with just a small gap for viewing the gleaming interior — Williams’ solo debut creates an experience that comments on race, class, and urban space. Chicago Works: Amanda Williams is organized by MCA Curatorial Assistant Grace Deveney and is on view from July 18 to December 31, 2017.
Continue reading “The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago presents first-ever museum exhibition of Amanda Williams – 18.07.2017-31.12.2017- 12607”

Exhibition explores collection and creative methods of popular art correspondence course – Stockbridge, MASS – 08.07.2017-29.10.2017 – 12606

Group photo of Famous Artists School Faculty. Left to right: Harold von Schmidt, John Atherton, Al Parker, founder Al Dorne (white shirt, on the ground), Norman Rockwell (with painting created for Cecil B. DeMille’s 1949 film, “Samson and Delilah”), Ben Stahl, Peter Helck, Stevan Dohanos, Jon Whitcomb, Austin Briggs (rear, far right), and Robert Fawcett (front, far right). ©Norman Rockwell Museum Collecton, gift of Famous Artists School. All rights reserved.

Established in 1948 by a group of artists led by Norman Rockwell and former Society of illustrators President Albert Dorne, the Famous Artists School, in Westport, Connecticut, became a household name during the mid-twentieth century. It offered aspiring artists correspondence courses in illustration, painting, and cartooning as a viable path to a creative and successful career, or, as the School put it, to a “Richer Life Through Art.” This summer, a special exhibition at the Norman Rockwell Museum explores the artworks and creative methods featured in the program, during the 1940s and 1950s. Titled Learning from the Masters: The Famous Artists School, it will remain on view from July 8 through October 29, 2017.
Continue reading “Exhibition explores collection and creative methods of popular art correspondence course – Stockbridge, MASS – 08.07.2017-29.10.2017 – 12606”

Large-scale LEGO installation “Trace” and 700-foot graphic works by Ai Weiwei debut at the Hirshhorn – Washington,DC – 28.06.2017-01.01.2018 – 12600

Ai Weiwei, installation view of Ai Weiwei: Trace at Hirshhorn at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 2017. Photo: Cathy Carver.

The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden is presenting “Ai Weiwei: Trace at Hirshhorn,” a solo project by Ai Weiwei featuring new and recent works by the renowned Chinese artist June 28–Jan. 1, 2018. The presentation marks the East Coast debut of “Trace,” one of the artist’s most significant U.S. installations in recent years, and features the addition of two graphic wallpapers to accompany the work, one never before seen. Together, the massive installation spans 700 feet around the entirety of the museum’s second-floor galleries, responding to the building’s unique circular architecture.
Continue reading “Large-scale LEGO installation “Trace” and 700-foot graphic works by Ai Weiwei debut at the Hirshhorn – Washington,DC – 28.06.2017-01.01.2018 – 12600″

Pérez Art Museum Miami presents first contemporary art exhibition inspired by the game of dominoes – 30.06.2017-29.10.2017 – 12597

Donald Sultan, Stacked Dominos Oct 28, 1994. Tar, latex, and spackle on tile over masonite, 96 x 96 inches. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Natalie Conn.

Pérez Art Museum Miami presents Spots, Dots, Pips, Tiles: An Exhibition About Dominoes, on view June 30–October 29, 2017. This thematic exhibition highlights the domino game, an activity played daily in Miami, as metaphor for contemporary art practice. Played throughout the American South, Latin America, and the Caribbean, dominoes have been used extensively in contemporary art to address notions of abstraction, politics, race, urban life, and social practice. The exhibition originated at Hunter East Harlem Gallery (HEHG) in New York and features more than 19 international contemporary artists—including Adriana Lara, Oscar Murillo, Betye Saar, Donald Sultan, Nari Ward, and Lawrence Weiner—working across a variety of media, including painting, mixed-media, sculpture, installation, and video. Spots, Dots, Pips, Tiles is organized by Maria Elena Ortiz, PAMM Associate Curator, and Arden Sherman, HEHG Curator.
Continue reading “Pérez Art Museum Miami presents first contemporary art exhibition inspired by the game of dominoes – 30.06.2017-29.10.2017 – 12597”

New-York Historical Society exhibition commemorates President John F. Kennedy – New York – 23.06.2017-07.01.2018 – 12593

The First Couple head to the inauguration ceremony, Washington, D.C., January 20, 1961. Photo: Paul Schutzer. Courtesy The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images.

A new exhibition commemorating President John F. Kennedy’s private life and public trajectory is on view at the New-York Historical Society, June 23, 2017 – January 7, 2018. The exhibition, one of the most exhaustively researched collections of Kennedy photos ever assembled, brings together images from the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation, Getty Images, private collections, and the Kennedy family archives that capture public and private moments from Kennedy’s life. Some of the photographs on display are iconic; others have rarely been seen.
Continue reading “New-York Historical Society exhibition commemorates President John F. Kennedy – New York – 23.06.2017-07.01.2018 – 12593”

Depression-era photography exhibition showcases resiliency of human spirit – Kansas City, MO – 23.06.2017-26.11.2017 – 12592

Dorothea Lange, American (1895–1965). Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, March 1936. Gelatin silver print (printed ca. 1960), 13 3/8 x 10 1/4 inches. Gift of Hallmark Cards, Inc., 2005.27.305.

A new exhibition featuring works by some of the most well-known American photographers of the 1930s will be on display at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City. Dignity vs. Despair: Dorothea Lange and Depression-Era Photographers, 1933-1941 opens June 23 and includes iconic images by five photographers: Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, Arthur Rothstein, Marion Post Wolcott, and Peter Sekaer. It is the first Depression-era exhibition at the Nelson-Atkins.
Continue reading “Depression-era photography exhibition showcases resiliency of human spirit – Kansas City, MO – 23.06.2017-26.11.2017 – 12592”

Exhibition explores life of actress, activist and icon Marlene Dietrich – Washington, DC – 16.06.2017-15.04.2018 – 12587

Marlene Dietrich with Parachutists by George Horton. Photo blow-up March, 1945. Deutsche Kinemathek – Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin.

“Marlene Dietrich: Dressed for the Image,” the first major exhibition on the star in the United States, opened at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery June 16 through April 15, 2018. The exhibition showcases the life and influence of the actress in more than 45 objects, including correspondence, film clips and photographs. Among the images are many of Dietrich at various points in her life taken by notable photographers including Irving Penn.

“Dietrich is a study of contrasts in many ways,” said Kate C. Lemay, exhibition curator and National Portrait Gallery historian. “She was known for her discipline and dedication to her craft while unapologetically breaking social barriers and embracing female independence.”
Continue reading “Exhibition explores life of actress, activist and icon Marlene Dietrich – Washington, DC – 16.06.2017-15.04.2018 – 12587”

Cooper Hewitt presents exhibition guest-curated by Esperanza Spalding – New York – 09.06.2017-07.01.2018 – 12585

Egyptian Story bangle bracelet, designed by Stefan Hemmerle. Made by Gebrüder Hemmerle. Carved pockwood, cut and polished turquoises and tsavorites, oxidized silver, white gold. H x W x D: 7 x 8 x 2.5 cm (2 3/4 in. x 3 1/8 in. x 1 in.).

As guest curator of the next exhibition in Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s “Selects” series, musician and four-time Grammy Award–winner Esperanza Spalding has lent her creative vision to shed light on the museum’s collection. On view June 9 through Jan. 7, 2018, in the Nancy and Edwin Marks Collection Gallery, “Esperanza Spalding Selects” is the 15th installation in the series in which designers, artists, architects and public figures are invited to examine and interpret the museum’s collection of more than 210,000 objects. For her presentation, Spalding has created thought-provoking juxtapositions among objects to show how material evolves into different forms as new designers adapt it for their own locales and cultural functions.
Continue reading “Cooper Hewitt presents exhibition guest-curated by Esperanza Spalding – New York – 09.06.2017-07.01.2018 – 12585”

Multipart exhibition includes over 170 works by contemporary Cuban artists – Miami, FLA – 09.06.2017-08.04.2018 – 12582

Waldo Balart, Trilogía neoplástica, 1979. Acrylic on canvas, three parts 244 x 165 inches overall. Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, gift of Jorge M. Pérez © Waldo Balart. Image courtesy the artist and El Apartamento, Havana.

Pérez Art Museum Miami announces On the Horizon: Contemporary Cuban Art from the Jorge M. Pérez Collection, an exhibition of over 170 works of art, spanning painting, drawing, photography, mixed-media and sculpture. The exhibition is presented in three parts over the course of a year, and features a rich panorama of recent work produced by artists living both in Cuba and abroad. On the Horizon celebrates the recent generous gift of Cuban artworks donated to the museum by Jorge M. Pérez in December 2016, and includes a significant number of recent acquisitions purchased during the last year with funds provided as part of the donation.
Continue reading “Multipart exhibition includes over 170 works by contemporary Cuban artists – Miami, FLA – 09.06.2017-08.04.2018 – 12582”

The Norman Rockwell Museum presents first exhibition to pair Norman Rockwell and Andy Warhol – Stockbridge, MASS – 10.06.2017-29.10.2017 – 12581

Bill Scovill, photo of Norman Rockwell in his Stockbridge studio, 1960. Norman Rockwell Museum Collection. ©Norman Rockwell Family Agency. All rights reserved.

This summer, the Norman Rockwell Museum presents the first exhibition to pair Rockwell (1894–1978) and Andy Warhol (1928–1987), examining their artistic and cultural influence during their lifetimes and their ongoing legacies. With 100 works of art, a selection of archival materials, and objects relating to their work and lives, Inventing America: Rockwell and Warhol shows how both of these internationally celebrated image-makers—among America’s most important visual communicators—created enduring icons, and opened new ways of seeing.
Continue reading “The Norman Rockwell Museum presents first exhibition to pair Norman Rockwell and Andy Warhol – Stockbridge, MASS – 10.06.2017-29.10.2017 – 12581”

New exhibition showcases recent acquisition of 62 works by 22 contemporary African American artists – San Fransisco – 03.06.2017-01.04.2018 – 12580

Joe Minter (b. 1943) , “Camel at the Water Hole,” 1995. Welded found metal, 56 x 47 x 51 in. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, museum purchase, American Art Trust Fund, and gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection. Artwork: © 2017 Joe Minter / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Image courtesy of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco present Revelations: Art from the African American South, an original exhibition celebrating the historic acquisition of 62 works of art by 22 contemporary African American artists. Works include paintings, sculptures, drawings, and quilts by acclaimed artists such as Thornton Dial (1928-2016), Ralph Griffin (1925-1992), Bessie Harvey (1929-1994), Lonnie Holley (b. 1950), Joe Light (1934-2005), Ronald Lockett (1965-1998), Joe Minter (b. 1943), Jessie T. Pettway (b. 1929), Mary T. Smith (1904-1995), Mose Tolliver (1919-2006), Annie Mae Young (1928-2012), and Purvis Young (1943-2010). These pieces join the Fine Arts Museums’ renowned collection of American art, adding an essential chapter.
Continue reading “New exhibition showcases recent acquisition of 62 works by 22 contemporary African American artists – San Fransisco – 03.06.2017-01.04.2018 – 12580”

Exhibition brings together paintings and sculptures from one of Jamaica’s most important historical artists – Miami, FLA – 26.05.2017-14.01.2018 – 12574

John Dunkley. Diamond Wedding, 1940. Mixed media on canvas, 16 x 20 inches. National Gallery of Jamaica. © John Dunkley Estate. Image courtesy of National Gallery of Jamaica. Photo: Franz Marzouca.

Pérez Art Museum Miami presents John Dunkley: Neither Day nor Night, on view May 26, 2017 – January 14, 2018. The exhibition, on view in the museum’s Rose Ellen Meyerhoff Greene and Gerald Greene Gallery, presents the work of John Dunkley (b. 1891, Savanna-la-Mar, Jamaica; d. 1947, Kingston), widely considered to be one of Jamaica’s most important historical artists. Neither Day nor Night includes paintings from the 1930s and ‘40s alongside a smaller selection of carved-wood and stone sculptures. Dunkley’s paintings are defined by their distinctive dark palette, detailed imagery—often landscapes––and psychologically suggestive underpinnings. His intimate sculptures reflect more figurative elements—people and animals—and offer insights into his unique iconography. His oeuvre spans little more than a decade, and only approximately 50 paintings are known to exist today, alongside a small number of sculptures. Although his work is well represented in the collection of the National Gallery of Jamaica, Kingston, as well as in international private collections, Dunkley has not been the focus of a solo exhibition since the 1970s, and never before outside Jamaica.
Continue reading “Exhibition brings together paintings and sculptures from one of Jamaica’s most important historical artists – Miami, FLA – 26.05.2017-14.01.2018 – 12574”

Jade burial suit on view in new exhibition at China Institute – New York – 25.05.2017-12.11.2017 – 12569

Jade embedded pillow with bronze panlong (coiling dragon) frame. Western Han (206 BCE – 8 CE). L. 37.1 cm (14 5/8 inches), W. 16 cm (6 5/16 inches), H. 11.4 cm (4 1/2 inches). Excavated from No.1 Han tomb at Houloushan, Xuzhou, in 1991

A rare shroud of precious stones designed to protect and glorify a king in the afterlife will be on view at China Institute Gallery’s new exhibition, Dreams of the Kings: A Jade Suit for Eternity, Treasures of the Han Dynasty from Xuzhou from May 25 – November 12, 2017. More than 76 objects originating from royal tombs dating from the Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 8 CE) will be exhibited in the U.S. for the first time. Ranging from terracotta performers to carved stone animal sculptures, the objects are extraordinary testimony to customs and beliefs surrounding life and death during the Western Han Dynasty, one of China’s golden eras. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated bilingual catalogue.
Continue reading “Jade burial suit on view in new exhibition at China Institute – New York – 25.05.2017-12.11.2017 – 12569”

“Outlooks: Heather Hart,” An interactive sculptural environment at Storm King – Mountainville, NY – 13.05.2017-26.11.2017 – 12563

Heather Hart, American, b. 1975. Oracle of Lacuna, 2017. Wood, shingles, building materials, iPad, speakers. Courtesy the artist © Heather Hart. Photo by Jerry L. Thompson.

Storm King Art Center presents Outlooks: Heather Hart, on view from May 13 to November 26, 2017. The interactive sculptural environment takes the form of a domestic rooftop, and will be activated by performances, discussions, and other events. Hart’s work spans social and participatory sculpture, drawing, and printmaking, and deals with issues of perception, liminality, history, and spirituality. Hart is the first Outlooks artist to create a work at Storm King that is activated by programming and public participation. Storm King has responded to the work by expanding its artist-driven programming and further engaging the surrounding community.
Continue reading ““Outlooks: Heather Hart,” An interactive sculptural environment at Storm King – Mountainville, NY – 13.05.2017-26.11.2017 – 12563″

New exhibition at Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum celebrates American Folk portraits – Williamsburg, VA – 06.05.2017-30.12.2017 – 12560

Jefferson Gauntt, Portrait of the Jennison Family, Brooklyn, New York, 1837. Oil on canvas, 2016-118, Gift of John Newsome Jr.

Before there were photographs, people in the late 18th-century to the middle 19th-century who wanted images of themselves and their family members commissioned portraits from a broad range of artists, many of whom had little or no academic training. Today, we characterize these types of paintings that fall outside of academic tradition as folk portraiture. These often naïve depictions of individuals, children, families and couples are beloved for their charming characterizations. The world-class assemblage of these portrayals in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, one of the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg, is among the most popular with visitors. The museum celebrates its diamond anniversary in 2017 with We the People: American Folk Portraits, a long-term exhibition of more than 30 portraits which opened on May 6, 2017. The show highlights new accessions on view for the first time.
Continue reading “New exhibition at Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum celebrates American Folk portraits – Williamsburg, VA – 06.05.2017-30.12.2017 – 12560”

Cincinnati Art Museum presents More Sweetly Play the Dance by William Kentridge – Cincinnati, OH – 26.04.2017-05.11.2017 – 12553

William Kentridge, More Sweetly Play the Dance, 2015. Installation view at LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France. © William Kentridge. Courtesy of the artist and LUMA Foundation.

Contemporary South African artist William Kentridge’s More Sweetly Play the Dance makes its North American museum premiere at the Cincinnati Art Museum from April 26–November 5. The work is a loan from the LUMA Foundation.

This powerful film installation encircles the viewer with seven screens, on which a procession of travelers passes across a charcoal-drawn animated landscape. The immersive panorama hints at multiple histories, evoking a danse macabre, a jazz funeral, an exodus and a journey. Accompanied by a brass band, the film references medieval manuscripts and the storylines of refuge throughout history.

Commissioned in 2015 by the EYE Filmmuseum, the installation melds silhouettes with the artist’s distinctive animated charcoal drawings. Kentridge’s work often begins on a single piece of paper, drawing and then erasing, adding new elements, and photographing his compositions of each state. These images are connected together to create animated figures that pass from screen to screen bringing the film to life. The film is 14 minutes and will be played in a loop. Lightborne, Indyvideo and iNETronics served as key technical advisors.

Cameron Kitchin, the museum’s Louis and Louise Dieterle Nippert Director, comments, “Presenting this spectacular new work by William Kentridge is evidence of an artist in his prime. The relevance of the work to today’s civic discourse is essential and revelatory for our visitors and educators. The Cincinnati Art Museum continues its unwavering commitment to inquiries into contemporary art from all cultures.”

A third-generation South African of Lithuanian-Jewish heritage, Kentridge was born in 1955 in Johannesburg, where he still resides and has his studio. He has earned international acclaim for his interdisciplinary practice, which mingles the fields of visual art, film and theater in a series of overwhelming installations or environments used as a theatrical stage in which the viewer is enveloped by compositions consisting of moving images, music and sculptural objects.

In “A Dream of Love Reciprocated,” in 2014, Kentridge wrote, “My concern has been both with the existential solitude of the walker, and with social solitude—lines of people walking in single file from one country to another, from one life to an unknown future.”

William Kentridge: More Sweetly Play the Dance is on view in Gallery 105, between the Cincinnati Wing and the newly renovated African Gallery. William Kentridge is represented by the Marian Goodman Gallery.

Website : Cincinnati Art Museum
Source : Artdaily

Whitney Museum opens exhibition of works from its collection – New York – 28.04.2017-31.12.2017 – 12550

Herman Trunk, Jr., (1894 1963). Mount Vernon, 1932. Oil on canvas, 34 1/4 × 46 1/16in. (87 × 117 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 33.26. With Permission of The Herman Trunk, Jr. Foundation.

Where We Are, a new exhibition of works from the Whitney’s collection made between 1900 and 1960, went on view in the Museum’s seventh-floor Robert W. Wilson Galleries. At a time when debate continues over what it means to be American, Where We Are proposes a framework of everyday relationships, institutions, and activities that form an individual’s sense of self. Where We Are brings together some of the Whitney’s most iconic works by Louise Bourgeois, John Steuart Curry, Edward Hopper, Jasper Johns, Jacob Lawrence, and Georgia O’Keeffe with rarely exhibited works by Elizabeth Catlett, Jay DeFeo, and Ellsworth Kelly, along with recent acquisitions by James Castle, Palmer Hayden, Archibald Motley, and PaJaMa.

“Where We Are surveys six decades during which artists responded in complex and diverse ways to dramatic changes in American history and culture due to economic collapse and recovery, cycles of war and peace, and new modes of personal expression,” remarked Scott Rothkopf, the Whitney’s Deputy Director for Programs and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator. “For his first installation of our holdings, David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, has fashioned a sensitive and stirring narrative that honors individual artists’ pathbreaking approaches to depicting American life and their often complex relationship to it.”

Where We Are is organized around five themes that suggest core aspects of one’s daily existence: family and community; work; home; the spiritual; and the nation. The exhibition, as well as each of its sections, is titled after a phrase in W. H. Auden’s poem, “September 1, 1939.” Auden, who was raised in England, wrote the poem in New York City shortly after his immigration to the United States and at the very outset of World War II. The title of the poem marks the date Germany invaded Poland. While its subject is the beginning of the war, Auden’s true theme is how the shadow of a global emergency reaches into the far corners of everyday life. The poem’s tone remains mournful but concludes with the individual’s capacity to show “an affirming flame.” Where We Are shares Auden’s guarded optimism, gathering a constellation of artists whose light might lead us forward. Continue reading “Whitney Museum opens exhibition of works from its collection – New York – 28.04.2017-31.12.2017 – 12550”

Harn Museum of Art displays miniature works of Asian art – Gainesville, FLA – 21.03.2017-25.11.2018 – 12530


Ryuto, Japanese, 19th century. Miniature Album, 19th century. Album of 12 leaves; ink and color on paper, 1 5/8 x 3 in. (4.1 x 7.6 cm). Museum purchase, funds provided by the Kathleen M. Axline Acquisition Endowment. Photo: Randy Batista.

The Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida is marking the five-year anniversary of the opening of the David A. Cofrin Asian Art Wing with a new exhibition titled Show Me the Mini. The exhibition features more than 100 miniature works from the Harn’s Asian art collection dating from the Neolithic period to the present. Show Me the Mini opened March 21, 2017 and is on view through Nov. 25, 2018.

The art of miniatures takes many forms and exists across time and cultures. The exhibition highlights the exquisite skills required to create these masterful works of art while addressing issues of size, scale, modeling, ownership, production, and historical and contemporary functions of miniatures. The art on view includes bronzes, ceramics, glass, jades, lacquers, paintings, portraits and woodblock prints with the majority of the objects measuring no larger than the human hand. Artists are from China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia with the earliest works created from China’s Longshan Culture (3,000-1,900 BCE) to video and sculptural works by contemporary living artists.

“We are pleased to celebrate the five-year mark of the opening of the David A. Cofrin Asian Art Wing with this exhibition,” said Harn Cofrin Curator of Asian Art Jason Steuber. “The purpose of building the wing was to provide a larger space in order to delve deeper into our Asian art collections and create unique exhibitions such as this one. The art of miniatures is often an overlooked theme in Asian art and the exhibition presents a rare opportunity to remind viewers that art comes in all shapes and sizes.”

Themes addressed in the exhibition include: perspective and scale, the five senses, collecting, multiples, religion, cricket culture, and games. A family guide and mini activity

Website : Harn Museum of Art
Source : Artdaily

Exhibition at Pier 24 Photography examines the work of ten photographers – San Francisco – 01.04.2017-31.01.2018 – 12528

The Grain of the Present, Pier 24 Photography’s ninth exhibition, examines the work of ten photographers at the core of the Pilara Foundation collection—Robert Adams, Diane Arbus, Lewis Baltz, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Lee Friedlander, Nicholas Nixon, Stephen Shore, Henry Wessel, and Garry Winogrand—whose works share a commitment to looking at everyday life as it is. Each of these figures defined a distinctive visual language that combines formal concerns with a documentary aesthetic, and all of them participated in one of two landmark exhibitions: New Documents (1967) at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, or New Topographics (1975) at the International Museum of Photography, George Eastman House, Rochester.

Looking back, inclusion in these exhibitions can be seen as both a marker of success and a foreshadowing of the profound impact this earlier generation would have on those that followed. Although these two exhibitions were significant, most of these photographers considered the photobook as the primary vehicle for their work. At a time when photography exhibitions were few and far between, the broad accessibility of these publications introduced and educated audiences about their work. As a result, many contemporary photographers became intimately familiar with that work, drawing inspiration from it and developing practices that also value the photobook as an important means of presenting their images.

The Grain of the Present features the work of these ten groundbreaking photographers alongside six contemporary practitioners of the medium—Eamonn Doyle, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Ed Panar, Alec Soth, Awoiska van der Molen, and Vanessa Winship. This generation embodies Wessel’s notion of being “actively receptive”: rather than searching for particular subjects, they are open to photographing anything around them. Yet the contemporary works seen here do not merely mimic the celebrated visual languages of the past, but instead draw on and extend them, creating new dialects that are uniquely their own.

All of the photographers in this exhibition fall within a lineage that has been and continues to be integral to defining the medium. What connects them is not simply style, subject, or books. It is their shared belief that the appearance of the physical world and the new meaning created by transforming that world into still photographs is more compelling than any preconceived ideas they may have about it. Each photographer draws inspiration from the ordinary moments of life, often seeing what others overlook—and showing us if you look closely, you can find beauty in the smallest aspects of your surroundings. As a result, the visual language of these photographers resonates beyond each photograph’s frame, informing the way viewers engage with, experience, and perceive the world.

Website : Pier 24 Photography
Source : Artdaily

Exhibition celebrates the centennial of Marcel Duchamp’s legendary “readymade” Fountain – Philadelphia, PA – 01.04.2017-03.12.2017 – 12526

Fountain
Marcel Duchamp, American (born France), 1887 – 1968
>© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Estate of Marcel Duchamp

To celebrate the centennial of one of the greatest—and most amusing—controversies in the history of modern art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is presenting an exhibition on Marcel Duchamp’s legendary “readymade,” Fountain. Marcel Duchamp and the Fountain Scandal focuses on the spring of 1917, when Duchamp, with the help of several friends, notoriously submitted a porcelain urinal to an unjuried exhibition held by the Society of Independent Artists in New York. Purchased from a store that sold plumbing fixtures, this object, which was titled Fountain and signed “R. Mutt” was rejected by a vote of the organizers, touching off a fierce debate. The Museum’s exhibition explores Duchamp’s staging of this controversy and highlights the radical ideas that were sparked by this crucial episode in the history of avant-garde art.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and CEO of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, said: “One hundred years ago, Duchamp’s Fountain turned the art world upside down. As artists and critics debated whether this was art or a hoax, the artist’s designation of the porcelain urinal as a readymade changed the course of modern art. Today, young artists continue to find inspiration and sources of provocation in it, and thus it is fitting that we return to this object and consider its continuing importance a century later.”

The exhibition is presented in Gallery 182, in which many of Duchamp’s celebrated masterpieces have been displayed since 1954. It details the story of Fountain and the roles of the colorful cast of characters around it, from the celebrated photographer Alfred Stieglitz and collector Walter Arensberg to the writer and artist Beatrice Wood. The exhibition includes period photographs, publications, and numerous other readymades, all from the Museum’s unrivaled collection. It takes an especially close look at the readymades, objects that the artist chose, signed, and sometimes inscribed with mysterious phrases. Duchamp considered them his greatest achievement. Continue reading “Exhibition celebrates the centennial of Marcel Duchamp’s legendary “readymade” Fountain – Philadelphia, PA – 01.04.2017-03.12.2017 – 12526″

“Hot, Hotter, Hottest: 300 Years of New Jersey Ceramics” on view at the Newark Museum – 22.10.2016-30.12.2017 – 12510

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Vase. Greenwood Art Pottery Company, Trenton, 1880-90. Slip-cast porcelain with carved, gold paste and enamel. Gift of Emma and Jay Lewis, 2011 2011.12.2, 13”H x 6 ½”Di.

On October 22, the Newark Museum opened its first-ever permanent gallery celebrating the extraordinary history of ceramics production in the state of New Jersey. Installed within the “House & Home” galleries in the National Historic Landmark Ballantine House, Hot, Hotter, Hottest : 300 years of New Jersey Ceramics provides audiences with a greater understanding of how New Jersey’s natural resources shaped its ceramics industry; the influence of New Jersey ceramics manufacturers and the production techniques they used; how pottery was used in different time periods and across social strata; and how, in the 21st century, contemporary makers continue to build upon New Jersey’s pottery tradition.No other institution is better suited to tell the story of New Jersey’s ceramics history than the Newark Museum. The museum’s New Jersey ceramics collection began in 1910 with an exhibition entitled Modern American Pottery, which included both art pottery from Newark’s Clifton Pottery, and porcelain from Trenton’s Lenox China. In 1915, the institution became the first museum in the country to produce an exhibition focused on a regional industry when it presented The Clay Products of New Jersey. Hot, Hotter, Hottest directly builds upon this institutional history while putting to good use the Museum’s remarkable collection of historical New Jersey ceramics—one of the most important such collections in the United States.

The Museum’s Chief Curator and Curator of Decorative Arts, Ulysses Grant Dietz, has created a checklist of 101 objects for inclusion in New Jersey Clay, to mark the 101st anniversary since the landmark exhibition of 1915. Ceramics high and low create a broad material perspective, including stonewares, yellowwares and Rockingham wares produced in the Amboys, Flemington and, Trenton, which became known in the 19th century as the “Staffordshire of the New World.” The development of refined whitewares and, ultimately, porcelain, is an important part of the story. So admired was the state capital’s output of ceramics that, in 1918, President Woodrow Wilson and his wife Edith commissioned Lenox, the Trenton-based manufacturer, to create the White House dining service.

Of course, it was a long road to the White House. In addition to showcasing the state’s achievement in ceramics, Hot, Hotter, Hottest traces the chronology of the industry in New Jersey, beginning with the geographic distribution of the clay pits and their influence on early settlement patterns. The earliest of New Jersey’s clay products were “redwares”—functional terracotta pieces that proved impractical to ship. A dish produced by Phillip Durell in Elizabethtown in 1793 is on display as an early example. Large yellow and gray clay beds in the Amboys yielded a great deal of raw material, enabling the early growth of the ceramics industry in the state. A stoneware beer mug helps tell this story, as does a rare Greek Revival coffee pot made by Jersey City’s D. J. Henderson Pottery ca. 1829-33; a mid-19th century Shaving Mug made by Charles Coxon & Company in South Amboy; and approximately 20 other functional items such as crocks, jugs and pitchers.

As time progressed and New Jersey potteries grew more technologically adept, stonewares and earthenwares were joined by more artful products. Majolica (earthenware with brightly colored glazes) grew popular in the late 19th century, and Trenton’s output of quality pieces helped put it on the map as the center of America’s ceramics industry. Several Trenton-made majolica objects are on display in the exhibition, including a unique potpourri jar made by Trenton’s Eureka Pottery and an exhibition vase produced by J.S. Mayer of the Arsenal Pottery for the New Orleans Cotton Centennial Exhibition of 1884.

By the mid-1800s, New Jersey makers began importing kaolin from nearby Pennsylvania, supplement the state’s own kaolin beds, that allowed them to produce refined whitewares and the translucent porcelain goods that enabled America to compete for the first time with European manufacturers in the luxury market. Hot, Hotter, Hottest includes rare examples of early porcelain, including parian wares by William Bloor and porcelain by William Young from the 1850s.

Trenton-born Walter Scott Lenox opened his Ceramic Art Company in 1889, a first-of-its-kind art studio (as opposed to factory) ceramics production facility. This was reflective of the industry in Trenton, where ceramics had indeed progressed to an art form. Alongside the production of utilitarian pieces, artists created ceramic figures, vases and other decorative items designed to be admired, not used. Roughly half of the objects on display in Hot, Hotter, Hottest are such objects of beauty, including the anchor piece of the exhibition: a porcelain and enamel “Grecian Vase” created for the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exhibition, or St. Louis World’s Fair, by the Trenton Potteries Company. Having been separated for some time, the vase has been reunited with its original base for the first time in this exhibition.